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The current generation of the Hyundai Elantra is on its way out, since it will soon be replaced by an all-new model that debuted last month at the Los Angeles Auto Show. Even though it’s about to be replaced, the current Elantra has done well for Hyundai and proven that a compact sedan doesn’t have to look boring. Buyers continue to flock to it, since the Elantra is one of the automaker’s best selling models. To make the 2016 Elantra even more appealing, Hyundai has released a new Value Edition that makes the Elantra an even better value than it already is.

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The 2016 Elantra Value Edition adds unique 16-inch allow wheels, a sunroof, push button start, heated front seats, a leather steering wheel and shift knob, chrome trim. The Elantra Value Edition provides a $1,000 value savings and pricing starts at $19,700.

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Related: 2017 Hyundai Elantra revealed with efficient 1.4L turbo

Beyond that everything else is the same. The Elantra Value Edition is wrapped in a stylish exterior thanks to Hyundai’s Fluidic Sculpture design language. Even though the current generation debuted five years ago, the Elantra has aged well and can still hold its own against top rivals, like the Corolla and Civic. The exterior’s series of curves carry over to the spacious interior.

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Under the hood the Elantra can be powered by either a 1.8L four-cylinder with 148 horsepower and 131 lb-ft. of torque or a 2.0L with 173-hp and 154 lb-ft. of torque. The base Elantra SE and Elantra Value Edition and Limited models are powered by the 1.8L, while the Elantra Sport gets the more powerful engine. A six-speed manual is optional, although the Value Edition is only available with a six-speed automatic. The 1.8L is rated at 28/38 with the six-speed automatic and 27/37 with the manual. The 2.0L is a bit less fuel efficient at 24/35 with the automatic and 24/34 with the manual transmission.

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Compared to the Mazda 3, the Elantra takes a more relaxed approach on the road. The base 1.8L is adequate, but not overly exciting. It’s acceleration is on par with some other models in its class, like the Corolla, but if you’re looking for something with a little bit of more fun, you’ll have to either step up to the Elantra Sport or head over to your local Mazda dealer. Around town, the Elantra’s suspension will soak up most of the road’s imperfections, but it would also be great if there was a bit more steering feel. One area where the Elantra does excel is by isolating road noise and providing an interior that is as comfortable as some midsize sedan, which is probably one of the main reasons that the Elantra sells so well.

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Although the Elantra will soon be replaced by an all-new model, the current generation is still one of the most competitive models in the compact segment.